Microchipping: one tiny chip for cats, one giant leap for their safety

Microchip your cat with Pet Health Club

Some cats love to roam and can get lost, others might be stolen, and a few, unfortunately, may even end up in car accidents. Microchipping your cat is set to become law in England in June, and taking this simple step will give you the best chance of being reunited with them.

From horror to hope

From horror to hope

Microchip brings seriously injured cat and owner together

Why microchip your cat?

Why microchip your cat?

9 reasons to microchip your cat before the legal deadline

The tiny chip miracle

The tiny chip miracle

Reuniting Helen and Simon with their cat after five years

Join Pet Health Club

Join Pet Health Club

Microchipping is included with our plans, as well as other benefits such as vaccinations, parasite treatment and healthy pet checks.

What is microchipping?

Learn everything you need to know about cat microchipping and what to expect during your vet visit from Dave the vet. Take a look at our video.

Lost cat action plan

Lost cat action plan

Check out our step-by-step guide on what to do if your cat goes missing

Cat microchipping guide

Cat microchipping guide

View our handy guide on what to expect when your cat is microchipped.

Cat microchipping Q&A

  • Microchipping offers the best chance of reuniting you with your cat if they’re lost or stolen. From 10 June 2024, it'll be compulsory in England for cats to be microchipped by 20 weeks old, ensuring they can always find their way back to you.

  • No, the new legislation only applies to England. Cat owners in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland should check local regulations, as requirements may vary. Pressure has been put on devolved governments to follow Westminster's lead and mandate microchipping for all cats by the age of 20 weeks.

  • A trained professional such as a vet or vet nurse inserts a tiny chip, the size of a grain of rice, under your cat's skin between the shoulder blades. The procedure is quick and causes little discomfort, a bit like a routine injection. There's no need for recovery time — your cat won't even know the chip is there. This chip contains a unique number that links your cat to you, which can be scanned to retrieve your contact information from a secure database.

  • The cost can range from £10 to £60, varying by location and provider. Cat owners who subscribe to Pet Health Club receive a microchip as part of their benefits.

  • Ideally, get your cat microchipped before they start exploring outdoors. Although there's no minimum age, from 10 June 2024, it'll be a legal requirement in England to have your cat microchipped by 20 weeks old.

  • To guarantee your cat's microchip does its job, it should be registered on one of the UK government-approved databases. These databases — which include AnimalData, Animal Tracker, Petlog, and many others — are secure, regularly updated, and accessible to vets, rescue centres, and police. For a full list of approved databases, visit the UK government's guide on pet microchipping.

  • You’re responsible for keeping your cat's microchip information current. Each database has its own update process, usually accessible online or via telephone. If you know your cat's microchip number and the database it’s registered with, you can contact the database directly to update your details. There might be a small fee for this, but it's essential to ensure your cat can be returned if lost. If you're unsure, a vet can scan your cat to find out.

  • Ensure the microchip's registration details are updated to reflect your current contact information. If you've adopted your cat, confirm with the shelter or previous owner that the chip's registration has been transferred to you.

  • No, there should be no privacy concerns. The microchip itself only stores a unique identification number. Your personal contact information is securely stored on the microchip's database and can only be accessed by authorised entities, such as vet practices or animal rescue organisations, ensuring your privacy is protected.

  • Immediately notify the microchip database where your cat is registered to update them on your cat's missing status and confirm your current contact details. You may also want to inform your local vet, rescue centre, and the community through social media or lost pet networks. The sooner you act, the higher the chance of your cat being safely returned.

  • Besides ensuring their safety, microchipped cats can also benefit from microchip-activated cat flaps and feeding bowls. These devices only recognise your cat's unique chip, keeping other animals out and managing your cat's diet more effectively.